Resource Type: Data / Fact Sheet

Data / Fact Sheet

父母の離婚後の子の養育に関する海外法制調査結果の公表について

 父母の離婚後の親権制度や子の養育の在り方について,当省が外務省に依頼して行っていた海外法制調査の取りまとめ結果と,結果の概要を公表いたします。
 本報告書は,主に以下の事項について,各国の政府関係者等からの聞き取りや文献調査を基に,各国の離婚後の親権や子の養育の在り方に関する,主として制度面について取りまとめたものです。
 ⑴ 各国の親権の内容及び父母の離婚後の親権行使又は監護の態様
  ア 父母の離婚後も共同で親権を行使することを許容する制度の有無
  イ アの制度が採用されている場合に,父母が共同して行使する親権の内容
  ウ 父母の離婚後の子の養育について,父母の意見が対立する場合の対応
 ⑵ 協議離婚(裁判所が関与しない離婚)の制度の有無
 ⑶ 子の養育の在り方について
  ア 父母の離婚時に子に対する面会交流又は子の養育費の支払について取決めをする法的義務の有無・内容
  イ 公的機関による面会交流又は子の養育費の支払についての支援の有 無・ 内容
  ウ 父母の離婚後に子を監護する親が転居をする場合の制限の有無・内容
 ⑷ 離婚後共同親権制度の下における困難事例
 ⑸ 嫡出でない子の親権の在り方

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Data / Fact Sheet

US State Department Annual Report on Parental Abduction

As a party to the Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Convention), the United States is committed to the principle that generally the courts in a child’s place of habitual residence are best positioned to resolve matters of custody, and that abducted children should be promptly returned to their country of habitual residence. The Department of State works with our Convention partner countries to strengthen compliance with the Convention and address issues of mutual concern. Likewise, we advocate with countries that have not joined the Convention to develop the institutions and procedures required to resolve international parental child abductions and to become party to the Convention. The 2020 Annual Report on International Child Abduction illustrates the Department of State’s efforts to prevent and resolve international parental child abductions during 2019.

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Data / Fact Sheet

THE FIRST 3 HOURS – Being Prepared Can Save Your Child’s Life

When your child has gone missing, you may naturally be feeling lost, confused, or isolated trying to make sense of the situation. In order to help recover your child in the midst of such chaos, it is important to remember that time is the enemy. Recent statistics demonstrate the importance of preplanning and initial response immediately after a child goes missing to ensure successful recovery.The first 48 hours following a child’s disappearance are the most critical to make sure a child gets returned home safely. However, the first 3 hours are the most crucial window of time for an initial response, as well as for gathering all available resources you have on your child. This is even more urgent on reservations, where Tribal and State jurisdiction can change quickly. For this reason, it is important to know how you can be the best prepared should a situation like this arise in your family or community.

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Data / Fact Sheet

A law enforcement guide on International Parental Kidnapping

International parental kidnapping, whether as a result of a parent or other person taking or wrongfully retaining a child with the intent to obstruct the lawful exercise of parental rights, merits the full and timely attention of law enforcement. The child (or children) should be considered to be in danger, especially when the person taking or retaining the child has previously threatened to abduct or harm the child or themselves, or is otherwise unstable. In these cases, the law enforcement responsibility is much broader than the simple act of retrieving the child. Officers, and the agencies they represent, who respond promptly, professionally, and efficiently to reports regarding what many term “family kidnappings” become, in effect, a means of protection for the child (Findlay and Lowery, 2011). This guide is for local, state, and federal law enforcement authorities who respond to international parental child kidnapping cases. It suggests methods for preventing international child kidnappings by family members; describes the role of law enforcement as the initial responder and investigator; discusses applicable laws, treaties, and legal remedies for child recovery and reunification; and outlines considerations for criminal prosecution and extradition of offenders.

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Data / Fact Sheet

Checklist for Public-Safety Telecommunicators When Responding to Calls Pertaining to Missing, Abducted, and Sexually Exploited Children

Reports of missing, abducted, and/or sexually exploited children may be among the most difficult, challenging, and emotionally charged cases public-safety tele-communicators and law-enforcement agencies will ever experience. The attitude and approach taken when responding to these incidents may determine whether the child is recovered promptly and safely or remains missing and/or in an exploitive environment. Each stage of the case, therefore, from initial call through case closure, forms a critical component of a thorough child-protection response. Since public-safety telecommunicators are the agency’s initial first responders and have the primary responsibility to receive, process, transmit, and/or dispatch calls, the manner in which the initial call is managed by the public-safety telecommunicator forms the foundation and direction of the overall response to incidents involving missing, abducted, and/or sexually exploited children.All agencies must provide its members with the necessary tools and training enabling them to act quickly and decisively when confronted with reports of missing, abducted, and/or sexually exploited children. The single most important tool an agency may provide is a clearly worded policy containing logical procedures and best practices for public-safety telecommunicators to follow when receiving calls pertaining to these incidents

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Data / Fact Sheet

INVESTIGATIVE CHECKLIST FOR FIRST RESPONDERS

This checklist is meant to provide a framework of recommended actions, considerations, and activities to perform competent, productive, and thorough missing/abducted children investigations with the goal of better assisting families, victims, and the community.

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Data / Fact Sheet

2019 AMBER Alert Report

This report presents information about AMBER Alerts issued in the 50 states, the District of Columbia,Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands from Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2019, and intaked by NCMEC. Although an AMBER Alert case may be activated in multiple areas, this report organizes alerts based on the state/territory of first activation. This report analyzes cases according to the case type for which the AMBER Alert was issued, not the case type at the time of recovery.

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