Resource Type: Toolkits / Guidelines

Knowledge Products

Parental Alienation – Evidence Based Science

Steven G. Miller talks about Parental Alienation: Among professionals who specialize in child alignment, it is well known that many aspects of parental alienation are highly counter-intuitive. Examples include how to distinguish alienation from estrangement, how to identify hybrid cases, and how to treat alienated children. Other examples abound.

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Toolkits / Guidelines

Parental Alienation – Crazy Making Issues

Ben Burgess, M.A., obtained his degree in psychology from Western Michigan University and is now a practicing psychologist with the Fountain Hill Center for Counseling and Consultation. Since 2006, his primary focus has been on providing services to individuals and families experiencing high-conflict divorce and separation. In addition to individual and family counseling, Ben provides comprehensive evaluations, such as custody and parenting time evaluations and parenting capacity evaluations, that help individuals, families, and courts make informed decisions. Through a variety of tools, including psychological testing, he helps people better understand their emotional landscape and identify strategies for negotiating obstacles.

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Toolkits / Guidelines

Parental Alienation – Historical highlights

One of the most frequent criticisms of parental alienation—even by believers in the concept —is that “the lack of consensus on the definitions of alienation and the use of varying nonstandardized measures limit the ability of researchers to conduct methodologically sound research in this area.”

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Toolkits / Guidelines

Parental Alienation – The Four-Factor Model – Ways to identify PA

Not all children who reject a parent are alienated. It is essential for proper management and treatment of cases of child alignment that alienated children be identified and differentiated from estranged children. Dr. Baker will review the Four-Factor Model for identifying parental alienation from estrangement. According to the model, children should be considered alienated only when all four factors are present: (1) there was a prior positive attachment between the child and the now rejected parent; (2) the rejected parent did not engage in abuse or neglect or seriously deficient parenting; (3) the favored parent engaged in multiple parental alienation behaviors; and (4) the child exhibits most if not all of the behavioral manifestations of alienation.

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Knowledge Products

Litigating International Child Abduction Cases Under the Hague Convention

The purpose of the first Manual, issued in 2007, was to provide attorneys with a road map for litigating international child abduction cases. Since the publication of the first Manual, the United States Supreme Court issued its first opinion concerning the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, and more parties have sought to resolve international abduction matters through alternative methods, including mediation. This updated Manual not only provides a general understanding of the law and its recent developments, but also describes practical considerations to aid attorneys in advocating for their clients. Finally, it raises issues and makes suggestions to ameliorate the potentially negative impact that these proceedings may have on the children involved in such disputes.1 As is evident in this Manual, representing a client in an international abduction matter requires a balancing of various considerations.

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Data / Fact Sheet

THE FIRST 3 HOURS – Being Prepared Can Save Your Child’s Life

When your child has gone missing, you may naturally be feeling lost, confused, or isolated trying to make sense of the situation. In order to help recover your child in the midst of such chaos, it is important to remember that time is the enemy. Recent statistics demonstrate the importance of preplanning and initial response immediately after a child goes missing to ensure successful recovery.The first 48 hours following a child’s disappearance are the most critical to make sure a child gets returned home safely. However, the first 3 hours are the most crucial window of time for an initial response, as well as for gathering all available resources you have on your child. This is even more urgent on reservations, where Tribal and State jurisdiction can change quickly. For this reason, it is important to know how you can be the best prepared should a situation like this arise in your family or community.

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Toolkits / Guidelines

Code Adam

Code Adam was created in memory of 6-year-old Adam Walsh, who was tragically abducted from a Florida department store and later found murdered. Code Adam is a program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, a nonprofit co-founded by Adam’s parents, John and Revé Walsh.

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Data / Fact Sheet

A law enforcement guide on International Parental Kidnapping

International parental kidnapping, whether as a result of a parent or other person taking or wrongfully retaining a child with the intent to obstruct the lawful exercise of parental rights, merits the full and timely attention of law enforcement. The child (or children) should be considered to be in danger, especially when the person taking or retaining the child has previously threatened to abduct or harm the child or themselves, or is otherwise unstable. In these cases, the law enforcement responsibility is much broader than the simple act of retrieving the child. Officers, and the agencies they represent, who respond promptly, professionally, and efficiently to reports regarding what many term “family kidnappings” become, in effect, a means of protection for the child (Findlay and Lowery, 2011). This guide is for local, state, and federal law enforcement authorities who respond to international parental child kidnapping cases. It suggests methods for preventing international child kidnappings by family members; describes the role of law enforcement as the initial responder and investigator; discusses applicable laws, treaties, and legal remedies for child recovery and reunification; and outlines considerations for criminal prosecution and extradition of offenders.

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