Topic: Parental Abduction

Legal Guidelines

Parental Alienation – Third Party Alienation

Shawn Wygant, M.A., TLLP, is a highly skilled and dedicated forensic psychology associate and expert witness. He specializes in the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of parental alienation as well as other complex forms of child psychological maltreatment. For the past 6 years, he has worked with Demosthenes Lorandos, Ph.D., J.D., on parental alienation cases throughout the United States as a forensic psychology associate and expert witness helping courts make the best possible decisions concerning the best interest of the child.

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Knowledge Products

Parental Alienation – A Splitting of the Self

Nick Woodall, M.S., holds a master’s degree in psychodynamic psychotherapy and has worked with separated families since 1999. In addition to his therapeutic work with alienated families, Nick is an expert witness in the U.K. family courts. He has worked extensively on family policy, developing new services for the U.K. government.

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Parental Alienation – A Trans-Generational Trauma

Karen Woodall is a Trans-Generational Psychotherapist Treating Parental Alienation. She is a highly experienced psychotherapist and author who has worked with separated families since 1991. Research reveals that adult alienated children suffer in very unique ways—ways that include a strong chance of becoming alienated from their own children.

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Parental Alienation – Evidence Based Science

Steven G. Miller talks about Parental Alienation: Among professionals who specialize in child alignment, it is well known that many aspects of parental alienation are highly counter-intuitive. Examples include how to distinguish alienation from estrangement, how to identify hybrid cases, and how to treat alienated children. Other examples abound.

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Parental Alienation – Targeted parents and the effects – Research

Estimating the prevalence of parental alienation is challenging because not all children who are exposed to parental alienating behaviors become alienated. The purpose of the current study was to determine the proportion of adults who indicate being alienated from a child using three national online panels that are representative of adults from the United States (two polls) and Canada (one poll) and to determine the mental health impact of parental alienating behaviors.

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Toolkits / Guidelines

Parental Alienation – Crazy Making Issues

Ben Burgess, M.A., obtained his degree in psychology from Western Michigan University and is now a practicing psychologist with the Fountain Hill Center for Counseling and Consultation. Since 2006, his primary focus has been on providing services to individuals and families experiencing high-conflict divorce and separation. In addition to individual and family counseling, Ben provides comprehensive evaluations, such as custody and parenting time evaluations and parenting capacity evaluations, that help individuals, families, and courts make informed decisions. Through a variety of tools, including psychological testing, he helps people better understand their emotional landscape and identify strategies for negotiating obstacles.

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Toolkits / Guidelines

Parental Alienation – Historical highlights

One of the most frequent criticisms of parental alienation—even by believers in the concept —is that “the lack of consensus on the definitions of alienation and the use of varying nonstandardized measures limit the ability of researchers to conduct methodologically sound research in this area.”

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Toolkits / Guidelines

Parental Alienation – The Four-Factor Model – Ways to identify PA

Not all children who reject a parent are alienated. It is essential for proper management and treatment of cases of child alignment that alienated children be identified and differentiated from estranged children. Dr. Baker will review the Four-Factor Model for identifying parental alienation from estrangement. According to the model, children should be considered alienated only when all four factors are present: (1) there was a prior positive attachment between the child and the now rejected parent; (2) the rejected parent did not engage in abuse or neglect or seriously deficient parenting; (3) the favored parent engaged in multiple parental alienation behaviors; and (4) the child exhibits most if not all of the behavioral manifestations of alienation.

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