Topic: MIssing Children

Japan Resources

You come home from the gym like any Saturday morning but this time the house is quiet.

No Spongebob and Patrick babbling from the TV. No “welcome home!” Not even an ambush with the honey-do list. Deafeningly quiet. The closets are empty, the suitcases are gone, and so is your family. Your spouse has taken the kids and vanished. You knew there were some problems with the marriage, but you never dreamed it was anywhere near this point. You call her parents who tell you she doesn’t want to see you again and to leave her and the kids alone. The police will not help. It’s over. You just got served, Japanese-style.

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Movies

Borrando a papá (Erasing Dad)

After divorce, fathers fight to see their children while lawyers and psychologists do everything possible to stop families from reuniting. The big business of child custody where suffering equals profits.

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Knowledge Products

Litigating International Child Abduction Cases Under the Hague Convention

The purpose of the first Manual, issued in 2007, was to provide attorneys with a road map for litigating international child abduction cases. Since the publication of the first Manual, the United States Supreme Court issued its first opinion concerning the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, and more parties have sought to resolve international abduction matters through alternative methods, including mediation. This updated Manual not only provides a general understanding of the law and its recent developments, but also describes practical considerations to aid attorneys in advocating for their clients. Finally, it raises issues and makes suggestions to ameliorate the potentially negative impact that these proceedings may have on the children involved in such disputes.1 As is evident in this Manual, representing a client in an international abduction matter requires a balancing of various considerations.

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Knowledge Products

When Your Child Is Missing: A Family Survival Guide

This Guide was written by parents and family members who have experienced the disappearance of a child. It contains their combined advice concerning what you can expect when your child is missing, what you can do, and where you can go for help. It explains the role that various agencies and organizations play in the search for your missing child and dis-cusses some of the important issues that you and your family need to consider. The first checklist, What You Should Do When Your Child Is First Missing, summarizes the most critical steps that parents should take when their child is first missing, including whom to call, what to do to preserve evidence, and where to turn for help.

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Knowledge Products

Family Abductions: What We’ve Learned An In-Depth Analysis by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

A family abduction is defined as the taking, retention or concealment of a child, younger than 18 years of age, by a parent, other person with a family relationship to the child, or his or her agent, in violation of the custody rights, including visitation rights of a parent or legal guardian. Between 2008 and 2017, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) received 16,264 children with 11,761 known abductors who were involved in family abductions cases. Children and abductors were analyzed for demographics, and missing and recovery information. This report also presents information pertaining to missing duration, as well the amount of time taken to obtain a state warrant or enter the child in the National Crime Information Center (NCIC).The majority of these cases involved children who were abducted by a biological parent (89.9%). Family abductions are more likely to occur when the child(ren) are younger and the abduction takes place most often during the summer. Children abducted by family members were most likely to have a mean age of 5 years old. Almost a third (32.2%) of these children were abducted in the summer months (June, July, August). In the past decade, there has been an overall decline in the amount of time in which the child is separated from their custodial parent/guardian when they are abducted by a family member.Cases with an international component had longer missing durations than domestic cases, but the durations of both were on the decline. This report found significant correlations between the time it took to issue state warrant and the missing duration of a child.

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Knowledge Products

A Family Resource Guide on International Parental Kidnapping

This guide imparts the group’s practical wisdom and the hope that other parents will not have to ex­perience the confusion and discouragement these parents did when it was not clear what to do or whom to turn to when their children were kidnapped. The group offered its suggestions for prevent­ing international kidnapping and gave detailed advice to maximize the chance that children who are kidnapped or wrongfully retained will be returned to this country. The guide provides descriptions and realistic assessments of the civil and criminal remedies available in international parental kidnapping cases. It explains applicable laws and identifies both the public and private resources that may be called on when an international abduction occurs or is threatened. It gives practical advice on overcoming frequently encountered obstacles so that parents can get the help they need. The guide prepares parents for the legal and emotional difficulties they may experience and shares coping and general legal strategies to help them achieve their individual goals, whether they involve recovering a child or reestablishing meaningful access to a child in another country. Despite the difficulties that may lie ahead and the disappointment some parents may experience, it is important not to become discouraged. Stay hopeful. Many things can be done to prevent or to resolve an international parental kidnapping. This guide will help you organize your response.

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